What Would Happen If a Charger Tried to Pull More Current Than a QC 3.0 Source Can Output?

There are four possibilities maybe more but mostly 4.One the voltage will drop relative to the current being pulled. The voltage source is going out of regulation.

Two the regulator will going into a overload mode and turn off Many Regulators have self protection circuits. This may cycle on and off until the condition is fixed. Three, the circuit will burn or short circuit or some other destructive state. A burned fuse or inductor or mosfet or ic. Four, unlikely, the circuit will go into a current limit mode.There is no way to know without all the part numbers and schematic. Of both your charger and the target (how it will act to under current conditions is even more complicated and guesswork) So best to not overload your circuit. The significant difference between the two source power output should be enough to make this common sense

I've got this charger: It takes 12.7 - 16V input from a car and outputs 13.05V at 6.1A (80W)

I want to utilize a USB-PD and / or USB-C QC 3.0 charger.

I can get a USB-C trigger: It connects to a USB-C QC or PD power source and allows me to select the output voltage.

What I want to do is connect:

QC 3.0 Power Supply -> USB trigger set to output 12V -> 12V car charger for DJI battery -> DJI battery

The idea is to use a QC 3.0 power supply to recharge a DJI battery (albeit slowly).

QC 3.0 can only output up to 18W of power, so if I used the USB trigger to select 12V as the output voltage, the QC 3.0 source would only output a max of 1.5A, but the DJI battery charger wants to output 80W of power.

Would this destroy the QC 3.0 source? Or would the QC 3.0 source just happily output a continuous 12V @ 1.5A and the DJI charger would simply charge the batteries at a slower rate (18W?) without damaging anything?

·OTHER ANSWER:

I've got this charger: It takes 12.7 - 16V input from a car and outputs 13.05V at 6.1A (80W)

I want to utilize a USB-PD and / or USB-C QC 3.0 charger.

I can get a USB-C trigger: It connects to a USB-C QC or PD power source and allows me to select the output voltage.

What I want to do is connect:

QC 3.0 Power Supply -> USB trigger set to output 12V -> 12V car charger for DJI battery -> DJI battery

The idea is to use a QC 3.0 power supply to recharge a DJI battery (albeit slowly).

QC 3.0 can only output up to 18W of power, so if I used the USB trigger to select 12V as the output voltage, the QC 3.0 source would only output a max of 1.5A, but the DJI battery charger wants to output 80W of power.

Would this destroy the QC 3.0 source? Or would the QC 3.0 source just happily output a continuous 12V @ 1.5A and the DJI charger would simply charge the batteries at a slower rate (18W?) without damaging anything?

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The Hottest Questions About Power Supply
Do you want to know about power supply? Here are some frequently asked questions.1. Will this video card work with this power supply?It needs approximately 149 Watt because the PSU requirements on most graphic cards are not really what they need to be. I am running a HD 4650 that needs "400W" but I only have 305W and has been working well for 2 years. Oh yeah not sure if it needs a 6 pin power connector so can not help you on that question. At the bottom is a link to "REAL" PSU requirements. EDIT: Oh I just looked on amazon and the XFX version needs a 6 pin power connector so it just depends on your model. I prefer XFX brand.2. How does a switching power supply differ from a power supply?Edit, solutions is doing weird and wonderful issues. I even have got here upon that while you are applying/ construction some thing with diverse relays, and applying SPDT and DPDT relays, it fairly is extra low priced interior the long-term to apply DPDT relays in determination to SPDT relays. it can be a 3PST Wingman3. Why is my power supply not staying on?A few ideas (and no, I am not making ANY assumption on your knowledge/Tech Level) A) Is board touching the case (Mounted correctly) B) Have you Disconnect all Peripherals and just booted the board. C) Are you using on-board Video or a separate Card (Voltages) Different cards (Video) use different voltages, the same as CPU's etc so I would disconnect all the extras and just boot the board. Does it beep? If the shut down is instant, then I would look towards you having a bad Motherboard (and/or CPU) but generally I would lean towards the board, but bear in mind, I am not there to assess, nor here to Judge.. Did you connect the speaker so you can hear any Bios Beep codes?4. Help with creating a computer--Power Supply?It depends on what you are going to be using it for besides average gaming. If you are going to power two monitors and color laser printer and some external USB drives as well as a high end multi-core CPU 600w wo not do. Some gamers get a bigger than necessary PS since they know they with get more memory, solid state harddrives, etc as their budget allows ( 1000W makes sense). However, if you are running only one monitor, no externals, and have a reasonable CPU 600 w is sufficient5. Power supply problem on my laptop?Your battery may be completely discharged. Just like other rechargeable NI-CD batteries, the Lithium-Ion battery will eventually loose its ability to keep its charge. The most simple solution is to buy a new battery.6. Buck converter based switching power supply?This is a simplified version of the circuit you have. Note the polarity is backwards from your circuit:7. How to test a Power Supply?Power supply Tester. They are cheap and will test ALL of your out put voltages and wattage. You can get them about anywhere. Very smart thing to do!8. 12VDC power supply for backyard stereo?go find your self a old pc in the trash and gank the power supply and tie into the 12vdc lines9. What power supply do i get?450w is fine!10. will my power supply power a 9600gt?It really depends on how long and how hard you push your system, you max out your wattage all the time might burn out that PSU, but most likly not11. help about power supply please?while a capability furnish is rated at 4 hundred watts meaning it may furnish as much as 4 hundred watts of DC capability. the capability furnish takes AC capability out of your wall outlet at a hundred and twenty volts and converts it to 12v, 5v, 3.3v DC for the drives, CPU, motherboard, and so forth. .. the certainty is that your computing device will use around one hundred watts AC capability or much less. A Kill-A-Watt meter might properly be bought for around $20 and that assist you to comprehend the real capability utilization of any equipment12. Power supply upgrade? ?Put it this way, a good quality 460W PSU may be better than a cheap 500W PSU. The key thing is the 12V current capacity, and the 6870 requires two PCI-E 6 pin power connectors. Most 460W PSU have only one, or none. So, I do question how they can properly power the 6870 with a 460W PSU, unless they had one designed to match the card. Do not accept that system if they use Molex to PCI-E power adapters, that can cause voltage drops and strange video card problems... PS: Their web site says there is an option for a 6770 video card, no mention of the 6870... A 6770 will run with a 450W PSU...
2021 07 12
Nyeem ntxiv
Using a 5A Power Supply for an LED Strip Rated for 3A Per Color
Typical LED strips have fixed current usage, due to the 3 diode 1 led setup. A PSU with a higher current capacity will not change this. It would only allow you to power a greater length of led strip.If you have issues with brightness at the end of a long run of a led strip, this is due to the high resistance of the copper FPC used. The main way of getting around this, is to feed the power at both ends, at the middle, or every few meters.Attempting to power a given length of LED strip with a supply that cannot provide that capacity, will result in a burned out PSU.Edit: Of course, your strip is the 150 RGB leds per 5 Meters. That's 50 3-Led segments, 0.02A per segment, or 1 Amp per 5 meters, per color. Your strip only needs a 3 Amp supply. The typical 2 Amp per color strips have 300 leds per 5 meters, twice of what you have. Led strips come in all sorts of configurations, and the number of leds per meter is one of them, as well as led type/sizeI bought a kit off ebay that came with an SMD 5050 RGB LED strip, an IR controller and a 3A PSU. Long story short, I have a second srip on its own and instead of buying the same PSU, I'm wondering if I can use a higher amperage PSU (5A) to power the strip so it can be brigher essentially. The ebay item is here.What I'm sceptic about is that (while not listed on the ebay page specifically) the strip is rated for 2A each colour, and the IR controller is also rated for
2021 07 10
Nyeem ntxiv
Driving LEDs Directly From Microcontroller Pins
The first and third methods you show are fine, assuming the resistor is sized so that the 8 mA maximum port pin current is not exceeded. The difference between these two methods is whether the low or high side drive transistor in the processor is in series with the LED. Sometimes the low side transistors are a little more beefy, which is why you see method three more than method 1. However, either method is fine as long as you take care to not exceed the current spec for the pin. Also note that some processors have a total current spec that must not be exceeded. For example, you could have 10 pins each driving a LED at 8 mA, which would be fine individually for each pin. However, if the overall processor spec is that all I/O pins together can't source our sink more than 50 mA, for example, then you're still out of spec.Your method two is wrong as drawn. It will likely damage the LED or transistor. To fix it, add a resistor in series with the LED so that the LED current does not exceed its maximum rated value. For example, let's say the LED is rated for 20 mA max, and it drops 2.1 V in that case. With a 9 V supply, that leaves 6.9 V accross the resistor and the transistor. The saturation voltage of the transistor is probably around 200 mV, but for worst case analisys let's just say it's 0. 6.9 V / 20 mA 345 , so the next size up common value of 360 would be fine. Working backwards, and this time assuming the 200 mV drop on Q1, the LED current will be 6.7 V / 360 18.6 mA. Even in a side by side comparison, it will be difficult for humans to distinguish that from the brightness achieved by 20 mA thru the LED.Here is yet another method, which is useful when there is a external supply available that is a bit more than the processor voltage plus the LED drop:This uses the transistor as a switchable current sink, so the exact power voltage (9 V in your case) doesn't matter over a wide range. When the base is 0, the transistor is off and the LED is off. When the base is driven to 3.3 V by the digital output, the emitter will be about 700 mV less, or 2.6 V in this example. The current thru R1 will therefore be 2.6 V / 150 17.3 mA. Since most of this current comes from the collector due to the gain of the transistor, that will be the LED current to a reasonable approximation.Note that the 9 V supply voltage didn't enter into the calculations. As long as it is above a minimum value, the transistor will sink very nearly the same current because the transistor gain changes little with collector voltage. If we give the transistor about 700 mV C-E voltage so that it is nicely in its linear region, then the supply must be at least the digital output level plus the LED drop, which comes to 5.4 V in this case. That means the "9 V" supply can vary down to about 5.4 V without effecting the operation of this circuit.The maximum allowable supply is limited by the power dissipation in the transistor. Let's say we want to keep it to 150 mW or less. 150 mW / 17.3 mA 8.7 V, which is the maximum C-E voltage for the transistor when it is on. Since R1 will drop 2.6 V and the LED 2.1, that means the supply can't exceed 13.4 V. So this circuit will work nicely and run the LED at the same brightness even if the "9 V" supply ranges from about 5.4 to 13.4 voltsIn the circuit I'm designing, I'm using an at91sam7s128 which is a micro-controller with an ARM7 core.Its PIO0 to PIO31 provide 8mA max which is low to handle direct driving of LEDs like this:simulate this circuit Schematic created using CircuitLabUPDATED: thanks to jippie and Olin Lathrop for telling me about the resistor in series with the LED.So some designers use a safer method, connecting PIO to the base of a transistor that acts like a switch:simulate this circuitOthers just make a simple trick. They connect the anode of the LED to the power supply and the cathode to a PIO:simulate this circuitIn the last method the LED will turn on when the PIO goes low - acting like GND - and current will be taken from power supply, not from the PIO like in the first method. So do I have to take care of maximum current of the PIO, although it just acts like GND, not like a power supply (like in the first method).When I set the PIO low, does the pin really get connected to GND or something else?NOTE: In this Atmel evaluation kit they use the last method, but I need to make sure.·OTHER ANSWER:In the circuit I'm designing, I'm using an at91sam7s128 which is a micro-controller with an ARM7 core.Its PIO0 to PIO31 provide 8mA max which is low to handle direct driving of LEDs like this:simulate this circuit Schematic created using CircuitLabUPDATED: thanks to jippie and Olin Lathrop for telling me about the resistor in series with the LED.So some designers use a safer method, connecting PIO to the base of a transistor that acts like a switch:simulate this circuitOthers just make a simple trick. They connect the anode of the LED to the power supply and the cathode to a PIO:simulate this circuitIn the last method the LED will turn on when the PIO goes low - acting like GND - and current will be taken from power supply, not from the PIO like in the first method. So do I have to take care of maximum current of the PIO, although it just acts like GND, not like a power supply (like in the first method).When I set the PIO low, does the pin really get connected to GND or something else?NOTE: In this Atmel evaluation kit they use the last method, but I need to make sure.
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Nyeem ntxiv
What Warning Labels Could You See on Products to Be Used in Space?
Nowadays there are warning labels on most everything: this is flammable, that will cause injury because it's sharp, this substance is poisonous, and that canister is under pressure, but what types of warning labels would you need for items designed to be used in a weightless environment? There is a very large set of possibilities. For real-world examples do some research on what NASA, Roscosmos, JAXA, ESA, CNSA do. The list below is just off the top of my head. Cannot be used in microgravity. Must be used in gravity field greater than X% of earth.Must be used in gravity field less than X% of earth.Cannot withstand acceleration greater than Y. Must be aligned along a certain axis for acceleration.Must be used at an atmospheric pressure greater than X.Must be used at an atmospheric pressure less than X. Cannot be used in Heliox atmosphere. Must only be unwrapped/used in an environment with a scrubber that can handle a particular chemical.Must be decontaminated via (some method) when moving from atmospheric composition X to composition Y.Must be exposed to hard vacuum for X hours before being brought into atmosphere. Requires shielding in a certain EM range. Requires grounding. Requires shielding from certain cosmic rays.Cannot be used during a solar flare of greater than X intensity.Cannot be used if organism X is present.Can only be used if organism X is present. Cannot be taken to an uncontaminated planetary environment.Can be injected into a person only if they have a certain symbiote/implant/genetic marker.Can only be used in temperature range X to Y. Can only be stored in temperature range X to Y.Do not change temperature at a rate greater than Z/sec OTHER ANSWER: The thing about silly warnings on earth is that most of them were added because someone, somewhere actually did it and did try to sue the manufacturer. Whether the warning can be followed in practice is irrelevant, as the only purpose is to try to give the manufacturer more leverage in case of a legal claim.So considering the actual incidents and accidents that have occurred in spaceflight, we can color things up a bit and warn:.
2021 05 31
Nyeem ntxiv
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